kid gloves

So, maybe you’re planning ahead, looking down the road a few months at the birthdays of the children in your life. Or maybe, like some who would prefer not to be named, you’ve got a play date scheduled tomorrow morning and you’ve just realized that your son’s buddy is turning five — is in fact turning five *as we speak* — and you are giftless. Either way, here’s a quick and dirty DIY for that kiddo in your life who loves to cook, or just “cook.”

Note: My method was based in large part on a fabulous walkthrough over at The Crafty Cupboard.

Another note: While I do use batting to give these oven mitts some substance, they are *not* recommended for use with actual hot objects, unless you’re looking for a really crafty, cute way to burn your kid’s hands.

Oh, here’s another note: You may recognize this fabric from the rocket backpack I made a few weeks back for another little guy’s birthday. It always gives me pleasure to go back into my stash and remember all the places my materials have been.

 

Kiddo Mitts

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So, as usual, let’s start with some simple patternmaking.

imageUsing a sheet of paper, cut out a tall dome that comfortably fits the subject’s hand, plus extra for seams. I eyeballed it, but you can take this more seriously if you’d like! It helps to fold the paper lengthwise and just draw/cut half the dome, so that it comes out symmetrically.

 

imageNow, cut a second piece for the thumb. For this, I traced the bottom section of my dome, stopping about 2/3 of the way up from the bottom. Then, I narrowed the top section, with the center reaching to about 4/5 of the way up the dome.

 

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Next, I put both pattern pieces together over a third folded sheet of paper, so that they’re all spooning together at the crease.

 

imageI traced the top part of the dome, stopping at the point where the thumb section begins to narrow.

 

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Then, taking just the thumb pattern piece, I turned it upside down and snugged the creases of both sheets together again, lining it up so that the point where it begins to narrow matches up with the point at which you stopped your tracing before. Trace the rest of the piece downward from this point.

 

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This is what you should end up with!

 

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Here are the three pattern pieces, which I’ve named “main” (the tall dome), “outer pinchy thing” (the outside of the thumb piece), and “inner pinchy thing” (the part that is exposed when you open your hand wide).

 

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Cut one (per mitt) each of your outer fabric, your lining fabric, and your batting. You see above that I cut two of each piece, since I’m making two mitts.

 

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Now, baste your batting to the wrong side of your outer fabric pieces. Baste with a 1/4″ seam, so as to be within the seam allowance. No need to baste the bottom straight edge of your main and outer pinchy thing pieces. After basting, I trimmed the batting back a bit to take a little bulk out.

 

imagePlace your outer pinchy thing and your inner pinchy thing (the ones with batting) right sides together. Stitch just along the curved upper edge with a 1/2″ seam. Notch your curve.

 

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Spread out your newly stitched together thumb section, and lay it over the main section (the one with batting), right sides together. Look at that, perfect match!

 

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Stitch these together with a 1/2″ seam, leaving the straight bottom edge unstitched.

 

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Repeat the above, sans batting, with your lining pieces. (I notched these curves and then remembered afterward that since I wouldn’t be turning the lining out, I didn’t need to! Ugh, unnecessary tedium.)

 

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Turn your outer mitt right side out, and leave your lining mitt inside out. Stuff your lining into your outer mitt (there’s probably a gentler word than “stuff”), so that the wrong sides are together.

 

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Now for some DIY bias tape. Take your lining fabric (or some other cute fabric, if you’d like), and turn it diagonally. Cut along the diagonal a 2″ wide piece that will circle the bottom of your mitt, plus extra for seam allowance. Mine is 9″ (circumference of mitt’s bottom) + 1/2″ + 1/2″ (seam allowances) = 10″. Also, cut another piece that is 2″ wide x 4″ long. This is for a little loop from which to hang your mitt.

(You might have noticed that I cut my pieces so that my lines of stars were off center. I arranged it so that one line of stars butt right up against the center of the strip, so that when I fold the strip later, they will show on the outside. Something to consider if you want a particular part of your fabric to show. Just go with it, you’ll see.)

 

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Press each in half lengthwise, then open them up, fold the sides in to the center, and press again. They should look like mine do above.

 

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Take your shorter piece and fold it in half lengthwise so that the raw edges are encased. Stitch close to the outer edge, like 1/8″ close. Then, fold in half to form a loop, and stitch the raw edges together with an 1/8″ seam.

 

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I basted this into my mitt at one of the side seams.

 

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Take your longer piece of bias tape and open it out. Sew it into a loop with a 1/2″ seam, right sides together. This should make a loop with the same circumference as your mitt’s bottom. Then, fold it back up along the creases. Making sure you’re encasing all three layers of mitt (outer fabric, batting, and inner fabric), stitch the bias tape so that it’s folded over the bottom edge of the mitt. And, voila!

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